The Most Underused Mental Power There Is

Snap your fingers. Sixty-five mental impressions happened in the space of that one second

The Buddhists believe that all of these “impressions” will stay in your unconscious for a long time. Months, years.

Eventually they will surface as events you experience in the world.

Given this, it is our mental impressions that determine what we experience from day to day.

Most people believe that there is an “external, objective reality” that  “randomly” causes things to happen to them.

That life is inherently random, a meaningless collection of billiard balls bumping into each other and creating the circumstances and events of our daily lives. They believe we are at mercy of all these billiard-ball collisions.

When you really think about it, isn’t that a crazy thing to believe?

Whether or not it’s crazy, it doesn’t work very well. That’s the worst criticism I can lay on it.

Life works better when you choose to believe that your own mental impressions are responsible for what others label “external, objective reality.”

Instead of lying on your couch depressed because you “got fired’ you get to work filling your mind with impressions and visions of future success.

You go outside and look for people you can help.

Somebody sees you helping others and gives you a job doing it. Now you’ve got a steady paycheck and health insurance.

Your life got better as a result of seeing the future, and acting in such a way that you saw yourself bringing that future into being.

It works better.

Being “at the mercy of events” maybe seems more rational, hard-headed, or scientific.

But it doesn’t work better for most people.

When something terribly happens and you scream “Why God why” and your friend says, “It was a random event from an uncaring universe, in which you are a speck of a speck of a speck (of a speck) of dust, and somehow that makes life precious and beautiful and your pain all the more meaningful” I always had to admire how hard they are bending over backwards to squeeze transcendence from the soul-swallowing blackness of existential meaninglessness. WHAT? It makes zero sense.

I’d rather say to my friend, “This is life. How you choose to deal with it right now determines whether and how you face it again,” and then watch them absorb the possibility that they could change their future by how they act right now.

Usually, this changes how they’re dealing with their pain. And it changes their future.

This is the most underused mental power there is.

If you can get this one concept — one second, one finger snap, sixty-five mental imprints that will all flower in 5 minutes to 30 years — then you can do anything.

Absolutely anything.

It is the most powerful and most important thing I could teach anyone. To really teach, so they really believe it, enough to the point they’re willing to give it a try, that is my only aim.

When you’re coming from the dominant culture billiard-ball mentality it sounds crazy, and unscientific, so your cultural immune system tries to reject it.

But if you take the time to honestly try it, you’ll find out the truth.

TRY IT, YOU’LL LIKE IT

Here are seven things you can do to try this out.

  1. Start each day with a wealth-building mantra
  2. Remove all mind-polluting garbage that keeps you mired in negativity
  3. Consider: each day you’ll have about 65,000 thoughts. What % them are positive, uplifting, encouraging, of service to others? You’ll start to win when you break 50%.
  4. Obsessively fill your mind with the words and images of those you aspire to become: for example, the One Percent men.
  5. Practice keeping your cool and not reacting negatively to “bad” events that happen, such as: boss yelling, co-worker being a pain, traffic, etc. You pollute your purpose by letting pettiness absorb your thoughts
  6. Realize that getting angry is like physically drinking from a cup of acid. Be aware of what happens just before you get angry so you can regain your cool before you drink from that cup
  7. Only say, do, think, speak, or be involved in things that you want in your life x 1,000. Don’t watch a violent movie if you don’t want violence in your life. Don’t accept a little drama unless you want a lot of drama. Etc.

Pick any one of these things and be consistent with it and watch the results roll in.

(The source of the ideas in this post is the book The Diamond Cutter which I cannot recommend highly enough.)

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3 thoughts on “The Most Underused Mental Power There Is

  1. Great post epic! For me I’m going to have to say that from that list I follow 23456 and I have been for a very long time! Ica. Tell you it does work as I learned to be a more controlled and disciplined person. Even though some times some people just tend to push me over the edge it still hold firm. I tend to be the most calm when the shit hits the fan and while everyone is crying Whoa is me! I’m already thinking of a solution. Keeping a positive mind helps in the long run! So keep practicing and in time you will have a more disciplined mind.

  2. Those Rwandan refugees ought to try this. It could revolutionise their lives! Famine, malaria, having militants cut of your head wit a machete – it’s all just mental impressions!
    Thanks, Epic!

    • Do you donate $5 or more a month to help those same Rwandan refugees? Your sarcasm on the Internet is not helping them. If you’re part of the global 1% it is your obligation to do your part to help those in conflicted areas of the world. My goal is to help those fettered by mediocrity in the “first world” become financially & emotionally free, at which point they will be better able to help everyone around the world who is in need of help. “I can’t help the poor if I’m one of them, so I got rich and gave back, to me that’s the win/win” JAY Z. By the way I believe it is realistically possible for EVERYONE alive today to achieve a world “one percent” standard of living meaning clean food, water, shelter, clothing, health care & education and this is my long-term project. So please contribute to this project however you can, please remember, sarcasm is not useful to those starving.

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